Summer Reading Lists

2016 Summer Reading Assignments

English 9- Regents & Honors

All freshmen must read Night, by Elie Weisel.

In addition to this book, 9 Regents must read one book from the following list; 9 Honors must read two books from the following list: 

  • Alas, Babylon (Pat Frank) – A story about civilization and life after nuclear war.
  •  The Declaration (Gemma Malley) – The world it features is a dystopian reality in the 22nd century in which humanity has cured all illness and aspires to eternal life and children are an abomination.
  • Summer of My German Solider (Bette Greene) – During WWII, a young American girl falls in love with a German prisoner of war as she helps him to escape.
  • Ten Little Indians, also titled And Then There Were None (Agatha Christie) – Mystery story of the murder of 10 strangers trapped on an island.
  • The Boys of Winter (Wayne Coffey) – Non-fiction account of the 1980 “Miracle on Ice” U.S. Hockey Olympic Gold Medal team.

 

ASSIGNMENT:

Part I – On a sheet of loose-leaf paper, you must hand write (no typed copies accepted) a list of 10 unknown words found in each book; include each word’s definition, part of speech, and an original sentence properly using the word. This vocabulary is due on Tuesday, Sept. 13.

Part II – An in-class writing assignment will be given on Tuesday, Sept. 13, on Night; a second in-class writing assignment will be given on Wednesday Sept. 14, on your second book choice; English 9 Honors will write a third in-class assignment on Thursday, Sept. 15, on your third book choice. It would be beneficial to take notes on theme, setting, characterization, and mood while reading.

English 10- Regents and Honors

All sophomores must read Lord of the Flies, by William Golding.

In addition to this book, 10 Regents must read one book from the following list; 10 Honors must read two books from the following list:

  • In the Middle of the Night (Robert Comier) – Years before Denny was born, his father was involved in a tragic accident. The family doesn’t talk about it, but the tragedy continues to haunt the family. When Denny decides to learn more about the accident, he becomes entangles in its web.
  • A Night to Remember (Walter Lord) – The author recounts the last hours of the Titanic from the perspectives of many of the ship’s passengers.
  • Rebecca (Daphne du Maurier) – The classic story of the second Mrs. DeWinter, who followed the man she loved from Monte Carlo to his lavish country estate, Manderly. There, she is drawn into the brooding passions of a romance dead but not forgotten- for always, everywhere, is the evil, eternal presence of…Rebecca!
  • Briar Rose (Jane Yolen) – The story of Briar Rose (Sleeping Beauty) is linked to the Holocaust when a young woman promises her dying grandmother that she will return to Poland and discover the truth about her past.
  • House (Frank Peretti and Ted Decker) – A supernatural thriller by this famous pair of Christian writers that gives new meaning to the phrase “haunted house.”
  • Fahrenheit 451 (Ray Bradbury) – Bradbury’s classic science fiction novel of censorship and defiance.
  • Castaway Kid (R.B. Mitchell) – The true story of an abandoned kid who was one of the last “lifers” in an American orphanage.
  • Saving Juliet (Suzanne Selfers) – A modern-day teenage girl goes back to Shakespeare’s Verona in an attempt to prevent the tragedy of Romeo and Juliet from happening.

 

ASSIGNMENT:

Part I – On a sheet of loose-leaf paper, you must hand write (no typed copies accepted) a list of 10 unknown words found in each book you read; include each word’s definition, part of speech, and an original sentence properly using the word. This vocabulary is due on Tuesday, Sept. 13.

Part II – An in-class writing assignment will be done on Tuesday and Wednesday, Sept. 13 and 14, on your summer reading books. English 10 Honors students will spend September 15 writing their third book choice. It would be beneficial to take notes on theme, setting, characterization, and mood while reading.

English 11- Regents

All English 11 R students must read A Raisin in the Sun, by Lorraine Hansberry.

In addition to this play, English 11 Regents must read a second book from the following list:

  • Black Boy (Richard Wright) – A sensitive and rebellious African American youth survives a life of poverty, familial strife, and Southern bigotry to pursue his goal of becoming a writer in the North.
  • A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (Betty Smith) – A classic! Francie Nolan lives in turn of the century Brooklyn, New York. She struggles against all odds to survive and thrive.
  • The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (Mark Haddon) – This is the story of an autistic boy’s quest to investigate the suspicious death of a neighborhood dog.
  • Into Thin Air (Jan Krakauer) – A first-person account of an expedition to Mt. Everest that turned from dream climb to nightmare.
  • Catch 22 (Joseph Heller) – A classic! In this satirical novel, Captain Yossarian confronts the hypocrisy of war and bureaucracy as he frantically attempts to survive.
  • What Happened (Peter Johnson) – This novel, written by a Canisius High School graduate and set in an all-boys Buffalo high school, is an account of a car accident that unfolds slowly from the voice of an unnamed narrator.

 

ASSIGNMENT:

Part I – On a sheet of loose-leaf paper, you must hand write (no typed copies accepted) a list of 10 unknown words found in each book you read; include each word’s definition, part of speech, and an original sentence properly using the word. This vocabulary is due on Tuesday, Sept. 13.

Part II – An in-class writing assignment will be done on Tuesday, Sept. 13, for the play A Raisin in the Sun. A second in-class writing assignment will be done onWednesday, Sept. 14, for the second book you chose to read. It would be beneficial for you to take notes on the following literacy elements found in each book: setting, characterization, conflict, and theme.

English 11- AP English Language and Composition

Part I- All AP Language students must read Eats, Shoots, & Leaves, by Lynne Truss; a punctuation test based on the punctuation rules discussed in the book will be given in class on Tuesday, Sept. 13.

Part II ­– All AP Language students must read On Writing, by Stephen King; this memoir will be used as out first in-class rhetorical analysis essay, to be written on Wednesday, Sept. 14 (this type of essay will be discussed and explained before the 14th).

Part III – All AP Language students must choose one of the following to read:

  • Farewell to Arms (Ernest Hemingway) – Set in Italy, this is a poignant love story taking place against the backdrop of WWI. A classic!
  • The Bell Jar (Sylvia Plath) – Sylvia Plath’s only novel tells the story of college student Esther Greenwood- her nervous breakdown and fight to regain her sanity and her life. A classic!
  • Native Son (Richard Wright) – For Bigger Thomas, an African American man accused of a crime in the white man’s world, there could be no extenuating circumstances, no explanations, and only death.
  • In Cold Blood (Truman Capote) – The documentary account of a 1959 murder in a small Kansas town.

 

ASSIGNMENT:

This book of choice will be used as our second in-class rhetorical analysis essay, to be written on Thursday, Sept. 15.

It would be beneficial for you to take notes on rhetorical elements used by King and the author of your third book; rhetorical elements include tone, dictation, syntax, irony, symbolism, ambiguity, allusion, arrangement, structure, connotation, figures of speech, style, repetition, etc,

FYI—you must discuss 3 rhetorical elements in a rhetorical analysis essay.

English 12- Regents

AII English 12 Regents students MUST read The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath.

In addition to this novel, English 12 Regents MUST read a second book from the following list:

  • Bleachers (John Grisham) – As their football coach hovers between life and death, his former players gather at their high school field to recollect the good and bad times of their lives and high school football careers.
  • Farewell to Arms (Ernest Hemingway) – Set in Italy, this is a poignant love story taking place against the backdrop of WWI. A classic!
  • Native Son (Richard Wright) – For Bigger Thomas, an African American man accused of a crime in the white man’s world, there could be no extenuating circumstances, no explanations, and only death.
  • In Cold Blood (Truman Capote) – The documentary account of a 1959 murder in a small Kansas town.
  • The Things They Carried (Tim O’Brien) – These stories follow a platoon of American soldiers through a variety of personal and military encounters during the Vietnam War.
  • Ophelia (Lisa M. Klein) – A retelling of Shakespeare’s Hamlet through the voice of Ophelia.

 

ASSIGNMENT:

Part I – On a sheet of loose-leaf paper, you must hand write (no typed copies accepted) a list of 10 unknown words found in each book you read; include each word’s definition, part of speech, and an original sentence properly using the word. This vocabulary is due on Tuesday, Sept. 13.

Part II – An in-class writing assignment will be done on Tuesday, Sept. 13, for the novel The Bell Jar. A second in-class assignment will be done on Wednesday, Sept. 14, for the second book you chose to read. It would b beneficial for you to take notes on the following literary elements found in each book: setting, characterization, conflict, and theme.

English 12- AP English Language and Composition

Part I – All AP Literature students must read The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time by Mark Haddon (Despite his overwhelming fear of interacting with people, Christopher, a mathematically-gifted autistic 15-year-old boy, decides to investigate the murder of a neighbor’s dog and uncovers secret information about his mother.). There will be a multiple choice test upon returning to school based on this book, as well as a short answer essay to express full comprehension of this novel.

Part IIAll AP Literature students must read The Dogs of Babel by Carolyn Parkhurst (Linguist Paul Iverson, desperate to learn the truth about his wife Lexy’s death, sets out to teach their dog, the only witness to Lexy’s supposed fall from a tree, to speak and give an account of the incident.) There will be a required preparation class for a round table discussion/assessment and rhetorical analysis of this novel.

Part III – All AP Language students must choose one of the following to read:

  • The Bell Jar (Sylvia Plath) – the story of a college student Esther Greenwood – her nervous breakdown and fight to regain her sanity and her life.
  • On The Road (Jack Kerouac) – this presents a thinly fictionalized autobiography of Jack Kerouac’s cross-country adventure across North America on a quest for self-knowledge as experienced by his alter-ego, Sal Paradise, and Sal’s friend Dean Moriarty.
  • A Streetcar Named Desire (Tennessee Williams) – Blanche DuBois, a haggard and fragile southern beauty, finds her pathetic last grasp at happiness cruelly destroyed in large part by her brother-in-law Stanley Kowalski.
  • The Picture of Dorian Gray (Oscar Wilde) – Written in his distinctively dazzling manner, Oscar Wilde’s story of a fashionable young man who sells his soul for eternal youth.

 

ASSIGNMENT:

An in-class writing assignment will conclude Part III where the student will express their knowledge of their choice book with a “Questions Only Essay.”